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The Body of Christ, Eucharist April 9, 2009

Posted by amberpeace in εκκλησία, living as a seminary student.
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Mutt. Mix. Melting. Those are the words that describe my spiritual and ecclesiological background. The Baptist piety of my soul yearned for the mystical connection of the Catholic Eucharist. Milligan College, in it’s well-intentioned attempt to show me the path of good congregationalism and “being like the early Church,” convinced me of the need for liturgy and high church. Something beautiful and redeeming happened when I chose to kneel in my pew. When I graduated from Milligan College, I left assuming I would never return to this community. I finally joined an Episcopal church and was confirmed into the Anglican Communion. I was going to live life as an Episcopalian. I was going to marry an Episcopalian. I would have small Episcopalians running around in topsiders and seersucker. Maybe they would play lacrosse.

God’s cosmic plan is never my plan. Less than a year and a half later, I returned to the Milligan and Emmanuel community. Now, a problem has arisen. I have labeled myself as Anglican. I hold Anglican beliefs, but I am not the 39 Articles personified. I am not attending the Episcopal Church in Johnson City. I’m not even fellowshipping at any time with the church. Instead, I am back at the church that I know and love, Grandview.

Is this wrong? I have spent many, many conversation on this topic. I surprise attack people. We might be discussing composting and suddenly I ask, “Is it okay for me to have communion presided over by someone who isn’t a priest?” For some reason, I can accept that Eucharist presided over by an Orthodox, or Roman Catholic, or Anglican priest is legitimate. Have the smells and bells indoctrinated me, or have they taught me a truth?

In my heart, in my gut, I cannot believe that it is a truth. Baptist piety is a fire that refines every thought that enters me. I am too troubled by the idea of denying the priesthood of all believers. I know many can tell me how that is different than the ordained minister I see at the alter. I cannot accept that. There is something wrong with the idea that I, as a layperson, cannot walk up the bread and wine and then ask the Holy Ghost to change the elements into the Body and Blood of Christ. This makes my prayers less effective. That belief means I am less than a person ordained. “No,” I am told, “it makes you different.” No, it makes me less.

But still, I struggle. In a few months, I will have a wedding. There will be communion, and I am terrified. What if I am not supposed to have communion? What if my beliefs about Eucharist, the Church, and the Body of Christ are wrong? The problem with Baptist piety, that runs so deep, is that your fear of punishment never quite goes away. I am a sinner, dangling like a spider on a thread, hanging over the fire.

In the end, my heart says that I will champion the layperson. I have been called clueless. I have been called ignorant. I’m pretty sure I took a grade cut because of my position. The fact is astounding that the Body of Christ can be so divided over the Body of Christ.

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Comments»

1. Nate - April 9, 2009

You’ve put your finger on the questions that, to this day, keep me from going Catholic. The tradition is wonderful, but the fact of the matter is that, once I crossed that bridge, I would have to spend the rest of my life treating the Christians who taught me most and those whom I tried so long to serve faithfully as people unfit to sit at Christ’s table with me. I know that the party line is that the Orthodox just “take the Eucharist more seriously,” but I’ve come to believe all the more firmly that taking the Eucharist seriously means sitting at that table with sinners and publicans as well as those who are clean.

2. rightrevelation - October 14, 2009

But still, I struggle. In a few months, I will have a wedding. There will be communion, and I am terrified. What if I am not supposed to have communion? What if my beliefs about Eucharist, the Church, and the Body of Christ are wrong? The problem with Baptist piety, that runs so deep, is that your fear of punishment never quite goes away. I am a sinner, dangling like a spider on a thread, hanging over the fire.

I stumbled on your blog – maybe miraculously – reading the comments on the “Stuff White People Like” blog (and, I feel as though I had to repent for reading some of those comments). ;-)

At any rate, I am trying to not draw too many conclusions after reading one post; having said that, your comment to which I referenced above sounds awfully…sad. Where do you get such viewpoints from reading the Bible?

If you can take this kindly, I think that sometimes viewpoints such as these warrant a change in paradigm :-) At the same time, the fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom – but, it is just that – the beginning…

amberpeace - October 14, 2009

The comments I made were awfully sad. The thoughts and fears come from looking back at a lifetime of doctrine that is taught in a well meaning way but is wrong. And that continues through life as we both know. So through my worry and anxiety, I have to faithfully sift out what is sound teaching and what is just human chatter and bad interpretation.


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